Saturday, February 11, 2006

Continuing Ridiculousness

House gets rid of W&M visitor Former Delegate Dillard, appointed by Warner, had long-standing college ties BY PAMELA STALLSMITH TIMES-DISPATCH STAFF WRITER Friday, February 10, 2006 H. MORGAN GRIFFITH House Majority Leader, R-Salem DEL. BRIAN J. MORANHouse Democratic Caucus Chairman, Alexandria House Republicans turned on one of their own yesterday, dumping former Del. James H. Dillard II of Fairfax from the board of visitors of the College of William and Mary. In a move that Democrats decried as mean-spirited, the GOP-controlled House voted 51-45 against confirming the appointment of Dillard to the college's board, to which he was appointed last summer by former Democratic Gov. Mark R. Warner. Dillard, a moderate Republican and past chairman of the House Education Committee, served in the House for 31 years and did not seek re-election last year. He was among the leaders of the 17 House GOP mavericks in 2004 who broke from their party's anti-tax leadership to support Warner's $1.4 billion tax package. House Republican leaders said the action against Dillard was not retribution for the 2004 vote but resulted from a political "betrayal" and an apparent "quid pro quo" with the former governor for actively backing a Democratic candidate last year. "My feeling was there was a quid pro quo between the governor and Jim that if you will support the Democratic candidate -- and he was very aggressive in supporting the Democratic candidate to replace him -- if you will support the Democratic candidate I'll give you this plum position," House Majority Leader H. Morgan Griffith, R-Salem, said after yesterday's floor session. "We didn't want to be a participant in that exchange of what I would consider 'blood money.'" Griffith said Dillard supported two former aides -- Democrat David W. Mardsen, who won Dillard's old seat in last November's election, and C.R. Clemmons, who waged an unsuccessful primary challenge against Del. Frank D. Hargrove Sr., R-Hanover. "I like Jim. It wasn't an easy decision," Griffith said. "The bottom line is you can't reward folks for being traitors." Warner spokeswoman Ellen Qualls said the former governor was disappointed with the House's action and disputed the suggestion that the two had reached an agreement that lead to the appointment. "Delegate Dillard is a well-regarded leader on education issues with decades of service and expertise," she said. "He wanted to continue in public service and his own colleagues said no." Serving on the William and Mary board is considered one of the premier gubernatorial appointments. Dillard's ties to the nation's second-oldest college run deep -- one of his grandfathers served as rector, and he is a graduate. Dillard, who was unavailable for comment, was at a meeting of the university board when the House took its action. Rector Susan Magill called Dillard's service invaluable and news of the House action "extremely distressing," college spokesman William T. Walker said. He said the college would find other ways for Dillard to serve his alma mater. Dillard's appointment unanimously cleared the Senate last month and survived an attempt earlier this week by the House Privileges and Elections Committee to purge his name from the list of appointees. The four other Warner nominees, including Barbara Ukrop of Richmond and Michael K. Powell, former chairman of the Federal Communications Commission and the son of retired Gen. Colin Powell, were confirmed. "It's fairly mean-spirited when you consider he was one of their own," House Democratic Caucus Chairman Del. Brian J. Moran of Alexandria said. "He would have been an excellent addition to the board." Such an action is rare. Four years ago, the Senate Republican leadership led an effort that resulted in removing 17 appointees of former Republican Gov. Jim Gilmore. In yesterday's vote on Dillard, five Republicans -- three from his home turf of Northern Virginia and two longtime colleagues -- and one independent, Katherine Waddell of Richmond, joined 39 Democrats in supporting his appointment. Some House insiders suggested the action was intended to send a message to potential Republican renegades who might break with the leadership this year to support Democratic Gov. Timothy M. Kaine's transportation funding plan. Griffith denied that claim. Kaine spokesman Kevin Hall said state law specifies that a person who is rejected by the legislature for a particular board seat is not ever eligible for appointment to that same board. "We will move as quickly as we can to put forth an individual to fill the vacant seat," he said. Times-Dispatch staff writer Andrew Petkofsky contributed to this report. -This is ridiculous. I commend Delegates Rust and May for simply not going along with the fray.

19 Comments:

At 2/11/2006 02:06:00 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

what WILL ben "biased" tribett say?

 
At 2/11/2006 08:28:00 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

This makes the Republicans look small. It is one thing if Dillard was still in office but he isn't. Having the House Majority Leader call the former Chairman of the House Education Committee a "traitor" for supporting his former aide and friend makes the Party sound like a cult.

 
At 2/11/2006 10:04:00 AM, Anonymous Freddie said...

Good for the Republicans in the House of Delegates. They are instilling a little party discipline. This was just a reward from the Governor to someone who broke party ranks to support a Democrat. Jim Dillard wanted the benefits of being a Republican, but not the obligations. When a person is faithless to his party, there needs to be a consequence.

William and Mary is not losing out. There are plenty of better qualified people who can be on the board of visitors.

 
At 2/11/2006 10:06:00 AM, Blogger Lucy Jones said...

It especially makes Republicans look small and petty when Warner is tramping all over the country talking about how he was so successful at getting Virginians to "work together"... He comes off as the great uniter and the republicans come off as the petty ones. How much more can we do to make this guy look good?

This is not the first example of "fine go to the Democrats if you don't agree with us". I get it almost daily!

 
At 2/11/2006 01:39:00 PM, Anonymous Rtwng Extrmst said...

"House Republicans turned on one of their own yesterday, dumping former Del. James H. Dillard II of Fairfax from the board of visitors of the College of William and Mary."

And just how many times did Dillard "turn on his own"?

 
At 2/11/2006 02:54:00 PM, Blogger James Young said...

You know, I, for one, am sick of having so-called "moderates" define what is "large" or adult behavior. Retributive justice is not "payback."

 
At 2/11/2006 03:14:00 PM, Anonymous Freddie said...

Jim Dillard became Education Committee chairman because of the party system. He did not see eye to eye with most Republicans in education, but since he was a senior Republican, he was given the chairmanship. He greatly benefited from the party system, and then turned around and betrayed those who were loyal to him.

 
At 2/11/2006 04:08:00 PM, Anonymous Miss Conservative said...

I agree with Freddie.

 
At 2/11/2006 05:51:00 PM, Blogger Lucy Jones said...

So if he were to be on the BOV, how could he turn on or hurt the Republican party any further?

What power does that position give him that he could use against other Republicans?

I'm really asking... I don't know what that board does.

 
At 2/11/2006 06:00:00 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Retributive justice is not "payback."

Retribution
Part of Speech: noun
Definition: payback
Synonyms: avengement, avenging, comeuppance, compensation, counterblow, just desserts, justice, punishment, reckoning, recompense, redress, repayment, reprisal, requital, retaliation, revanche, revenge, reward, satisfaction, vengeance, what for

 
At 2/11/2006 06:02:00 PM, Anonymous Freddie said...

Mostly, being on a Board of Visitors is a high prestige, low work job. It's a reward for previous work.

 
At 2/11/2006 06:08:00 PM, Blogger E Joseph West said...

Mr James H Dillard, II
Fairfax, Virginia

Jim,

It is with great satisfaction that I learn of your rejection by the House of Delegates
for a position as Visitor at the College of William & Mary, also my alma mater
(MBA, 1990). Justice was done. The attached two articles below explain the
situation in detail. I note that you made yourself "unavailable for comment" to
both reporters.

The Board of Visitors is wrong to cite your "unwavering principle" in a resolution
questioning the judgment of the House of Delegates, because it was your lack of
principle over many years which eventually lead to your rejection for this appoint-
ment by Mark Warner, who also did not act on either conviction or his promises
or his word while he was Governor (What a guy to align yourself with!).

Yes, you had a long career as a Delegate, but one which should be characterized as
running as a Republican and then turning your back on nearly every core principle
of the Republican Party. You often did that gleefully in a way to appeal to your
core constituency, unionized public school teachers. To this day, journalists often
refer to you as a "moderate," which is unsupported by either your political positions
or your voting record; on the contrary, one must label you a liberal based on that
record. You did not even have the common decency to claim that you were an
"independent Republican," as did a recent candidate for Governor who garnered
less than 2 percent of the vote.

Finally, I sense that the liberal component of our political spectrum already was
"over quota" at the College of William & Mary before your aborted appointment
to the Board of Visitors. The purpose of a university is the search for truth and
the education of young people in the known truth. Observing your actions and
statements over a twenty-five year period, I have no idea how you would have
contributed to that fundamental mission.

E Joseph West
Falls Church, Virginia

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

W&M Board Lauds Member Ousted by Former GOP Colleagues

By LARRY O'DELL
Associated Press Writer
Friday, February 10, 2006


RICHMOND, Va. - The College of William and Mary's Board of Visitors on Friday unanimously approved a resolution commending James H. Dillard II, whose confirmation to the board was denied by his former Republican colleagues in the House of Delegates.

Dillard was a Republican delegate from Fairfax County for 32 years before retiring last year. Former Democratic Gov. Mark R. Warner appointed him to the board of his alma mater, but the House voted 51-45 to reject Dillard's appointment Thursday. All the votes against Dillard were cast by Republicans or GOP-leaning independents.

House Majority Leader H. Morgan Griffith, R-Salem, said the House GOP caucus opposed the appointment because Dillard campaigned for his Democratic successor and supported Republican Del. Frank Hargrove's primary opponent. Both of the candidates Dillard supported had worked as his aide.

Dillard, who learned about the House action while he was attending his third board meeting on the Williamsburg campus Thursday, has not returned phone calls seeking comment. Warner spokeswoman Ellen Qualls said the former governor was disappointed and saddened by the action.

The board lavishly praised Dillard in its seven-paragraph resolution.

"The College of William and Mary has indeed grown better due to Jim's friendship, stewardship, and leadership; its Board of Visitors will be the poorer without his voice," the resolution says.

"His unwavering principle, courage, and conviction, will _ as it has throughout his life _ find a way to affect us for the good _ and his example will continue to shine bright for our students, his colleagues, and all the citizens of Virginia."

This story can be found at: http://www.timesdispatch.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=RTD%2FMGArticle%2FRTD_BasicArticle&%09s=1045855935241&c=MGArticle&cid=1137834014211&path=%21news%21vaapwire



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


House Gets Rid of W&M Visitor
Former Delegate Dillard, appointed by Warner, had long-standing college ties

BY PAMELA STALLSMITH
TIMES-DISPATCH STAFF WRITER
Friday, February 10, 2006



H. MORGAN GRIFFITH, House Majority Leader, R-Salem; DEL. BRIAN J. MORAN, House Democratic Caucus Chairman, Alexandria

House Republicans turned on one of their own yesterday, dumping former Del. James H. Dillard II of Fairfax from the board of visitors of the College of William and Mary.

In a move that Democrats decried as mean-spirited, the GOP-controlled House voted 51-45 against confirming the appointment of Dillard to the college's board, to which he was appointed last summer by former Democratic Gov. Mark R. Warner.

Dillard, a moderate Republican and past chairman of the House Education Committee, served in the House for 31 years and did not seek re-election last year. He was among the leaders of the 17 House GOP mavericks in 2004 who broke from their party's anti-tax leadership to support Warner's $1.4 billion tax package.

House Republican leaders said the action against Dillard was not retribution for the 2004 vote but resulted from a political "betrayal" and an apparent "quid pro quo" with the former governor for actively backing a Democratic candidate last year.

"My feeling was there was a quid pro quo between the governor and Jim that if you will support the Democratic candidate -- and he was very aggressive in supporting the Democratic candidate to replace him -- if you will support the Democratic candidate I'll give you this plum position," House Majority Leader H. Morgan Griffith, R-Salem, said after yesterday's floor session.

"We didn't want to be a participant in that exchange of what I would consider 'blood money.'"

Griffith said Dillard supported two former aides -- Democrat David W. Mardsen, who won Dillard's old seat in last November's election, and C.R. Clemmons, who waged an unsuccessful primary challenge against Del. Frank D. Hargrove Sr., R-Hanover.

"I like Jim. It wasn't an easy decision," Griffith said. "The bottom line is you can't reward folks for being traitors."

Warner spokeswoman Ellen Qualls said the former governor was disappointed with the House's action and disputed the suggestion that the two had reached an agreement that lead to the appointment.

"Delegate Dillard is a well-regarded leader on education issues with decades of service and expertise," she said. "He wanted to continue in public service and his own colleagues said no."

Serving on the William and Mary board is considered one of the premier gubernatorial appointments. Dillard's ties to the nation's second-oldest college run deep -- one of his grandfathers served as rector, and he is a graduate.

Dillard, who was unavailable for comment, was at a meeting of the university board when the House took its action. Rector Susan Magill called Dillard's service invaluable and news of the House action "extremely distressing," college spokesman William T. Walker said. He said the college would find other ways for Dillard to serve his alma mater.

Dillard's appointment unanimously cleared the Senate last month and survived an attempt earlier this week by the House Privileges and Elections Committee to purge his name from the list of appointees.

The four other Warner nominees, including Barbara Ukrop of Richmond and Michael K. Powell, former chairman of the Federal Communications Commission and the son of retired Gen. Colin Powell, were confirmed.

"It's fairly mean-spirited when you consider he was one of their own," House Democratic Caucus Chairman Del. Brian J. Moran of Alexandria said. "He would have been an excellent addition to the board."

Such an action is rare. Four years ago, the Senate Republican leadership led an effort that resulted in removing 17 appointees of former Republican Gov. Jim Gilmore.

In yesterday's vote on Dillard, five Republicans -- three from his home turf of Northern Virginia and two longtime colleagues -- and one independent, Katherine Waddell of Richmond, joined 39 Democrats in supporting his appointment.

Some House insiders suggested the action was intended to send a message to potential Republican renegades who might break with the leadership this year to support Democratic Gov. Timothy M. Kaine's transportation funding plan. Griffith denied that claim.

Kaine spokesman Kevin Hall said state law specifies that a person who is rejected by the legislature for a particular board seat is not ever eligible for appointment to that same board.

"We will move as quickly as we can to put forth an individual to fill the vacant seat," he said.

Times-Dispatch staff writer Andrew Petkofsky contributed to this report.

Contact staff writer Pamela Stallsmith at pstallsmith@timesdispatch.com or (804) 649-6746.
This story can be found at: http://www.timesdispatch.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=RTD%2FMGArticle%2FRTD_BasicArticle&c=MGArticle&cid=1137833996727&path=%21news%21politics&s=1045855935264



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 
At 2/11/2006 07:04:00 PM, Anonymous Miss Conservative said...

To Lucy Jones re: "if he were to be on the BOV, how could he turn on or hurt the Republican party any further? What power does that position give him that he could use against other Republicans?"

Had he been confirmed, Mr. Dillard would have continued with similar actions by: 1) remaining silent,when called upon otherwise, in his support of well qualified Republican candidates who support the core principles of the Republican Party that he does agree with; or, 2) perhaps coming out for the Republican's opponent in the general election; or 3) publicly disagreeing with certain issues or positions of the current Lt. Governor or Attorney General. Now he's free to act on his own accord with no elective or appointed title.

 
At 2/11/2006 11:42:00 PM, Blogger Lucy Jones said...

How did this guy stay in the House for 31 years? Did he tow the line all those years or were there other incidents before '04?

 
At 2/12/2006 12:21:00 AM, Blogger criticallythinking said...

On your honor guys -- how many of you wrote anything to complain about pettiness or "attacking their own" when the moderate-liberal senate republican leadership took aim at the Gilmore appointees?

It is somewhat "petty", but so is much of what is necessary party discipline, when you are on the side of the ones being disciplined.

I remember that Karl Rove was denied a seat on a board in a texas university by democrats who were mad that he kept getting republicans elected.

If you don't think that these appointments should be mixed up in politics, write your representatives and tell them to remove the requirement to have the legislature vote on these positions, or at least to remove the "once-out, never in" rules.

 
At 2/12/2006 12:25:00 AM, Blogger criticallythinking said...

And don't forget, if Dilliard and Reese had remembered the "R" before their names, and the years that the conservatives helped get them elected even though they voted against our interests -- if they had worked as hard for republicans as we did for them, or at least as hard as they actually worked for the democrats in the races --

then we might not have lost the 2 seats in NoVa, democrats wouldn't have been energized, we might have held the special election seats, and the lone loss in the 2005 election would have been the two "most extreme" republicans (I use that for this crowd, not my own label) Marr and Black.

In other words, the angst of the republican party, and the boyuant mood of the democrats, can fairly be laid lastly at the feet of Dilliard and Reese.

Meanwhile, those of us who understand budgets can also blame them for running up billion-dollar surpluses by hiking our taxes needlessly while increasing spending by double-digit amounts.

So while it may be petty, I don't really feel bad for Dilliard. He made his bed.

 
At 2/13/2006 09:05:00 AM, Blogger Involved said...

I was going to add to the conversation, but I think 'criticallythinking' reflected my views exactly.

Thanks for posting, CT!

 
At 2/15/2006 09:37:00 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Dillard got exactly what he deserved. If he had issues with the party and was a man of honor he shuld have switched parties. Instead he takes advantage of the party structure and maintained his chairmanship.

BUT

If the Republicans in the House of Delegates wanted to instill party discipline they should have done so when Dillard was still a member and not allowed him to be a committee chairman.

The GOP in the HOD does look small and petty bu doing this. Not because Dillard deserved to be on the W&M board of visitors but because they (GOP HOD memebers) only decided to show some back bone after he left.

 
At 2/23/2006 02:38:00 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Too Conservative: you are absolutly right, don't listen to the whackjobs who obviously don't get it (west i am talking about you specifically, you probably need professional help). If the republicans keep acting the way they do, they can kiss everything they have gained over the last fifty years goodbye.

 

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